The U.S. denies that it politically imprisons its "citizens, that there are no political prisoners in the U.S., as if the whole U.S. industry of mass incarceration is not itself political. There are hundreds of Political Prisoners in the U.S., and millions who are the unwitting victims of U.S. economic and social policies that are race and class based. Those who rise in opposition to this the system, who speak out and take action against oppression, if not murdered by the government, then they are captured and imprisoned indefinitely under sham pretenses or righteous actions of Revolutionary Commitment to the People. Learn more on the issue here...

The Counter Intelligence Program / 

O I N T E L P R O :

The FBI's War on Black America

     A U.S. government assault on the Black struggle for social justice that was unleashed in the 1960s to "disrupt, discredit, and destroy." It targeted and continues to target the most revolutionary elements of the Black struggle to build social movement. Created and led by the notorious gay racist J. Edgar Hoover, the government engaged in all manner of crime to destroy the "black threat." Martin Luther King, Malcolm x, Fred Hampton, Mark Clark, Bunchie Carter, and numerous others were assassinated under COINTELPRO; while hundreds were imprisoned behind it. 

     This video is a must watch for anyone seeking to learn and understand the history of America's ongoing low-intensity war on the black struggle, especially on those who dare to struggle, dare to win.

      So Their Story Goes  ...that, when sheriff's deputies, Aldranon English (28),  and Ricky Kinchen (35), went to serve a questionable arrest warrant for a relatively minor offense, they supposedly found Al-Amin "standing in a black trench coat by a parked black Mercedes-Benz, they were not prepared for what came next. Finding Al-Amin's hands concealed, they followed standard procedure and ordered him to show his hands. "OK, here they are," he replied and allegedly pulled out two guns, firing first a .223 caliber assault rifle, then switching to a 9 mm revolver. English was shot in both legs, the left arm and right chest. Six bullets killed Kinchen. The next day English identified Al-Amin from a selection of mug shots."

  Jamil Al-Amin is a Political Prisoner of U.S. Racism: Having villeinized "H. Rap Brown," declared as part of "the greatest threat to domestic U.S. Security" by J. Edgar Hoover, placed on the "Most Wanted"  list, yet exposed the racist illegitimacy of the government's case. Then goes on to reform an entire community of Atlanta from one that was drug and crime riddened, to one that became drug-free, low crime, and safe for all people. The "West End" story, one not possible without the presence and initiatives of Jamil Alamin. Yet, he rots imprisoned for doing nothing more than surviving and defying COINTELPRO.

 Lynching in Amerikkka: the Case of the Mississippi Three: Otis Lee Fairley, Charles Montgomery, and the late Samuel B. Johnson who always has a smile. 

(ITJ has not been able to locate of photo of Samuel Brice Johnson, who died in prison in March 2001

      On December 31, 1981, Otis Lee Fairley, his cousin Anthony Fields, Charles Montgomery, and Samuel Johnson traveled from New Orleans to Collins, Mississippi, to spend New Years with family to Fairley and Fields. Although they had passed some phony checks in New Orleans, their intent for coming to Collins was strictly to visit family. However, the four black men passed by Trooper Billy Langham sitting by the side of the road. Langham decided to stop the men and upon learning that Samuel Johnson did not have a valid license, decided that he was going to arrest all four men and search their car. Although Langham was dead, it was said that what prompted his action was that he spotted an old rusty butcher knife on the floor, which was in fact under the passenger seat in the back along with some other junk. Langham was very careless in ordering the four men from the car and anxiously beginning his search of the car, before the last one out got back to his patrol where the other three were standing, and that was Anthony Fields. Fields was seated in the rear were the butcher knife, which is where Langham started his search, There was also the machine used to make the phony checks, which Fairley, Johnson, and Montgomery were not worried about since they had not passed any phony checks in Mississippi. However, Anthony Fields, who had not been involved with any of the phony checks, panicked, Before Fields got to the rear of their car, Langham pulled out the knife and put it on the roof of the car, at which point Fields jumped back, grabbed it and stabbed Langham in the back.

   When the other three men saw this, it was Samuel Johnson who first leaped to stop Fields from landing a second blow with the knife, mistakenly grabbing the blade, which cut a deep slice across his palm. Johnson was not able to stop that second stab, by which time Langham had straightened up out of the car and began tussling with Fields for the knife. In the mean time Fairley and Montgomery are stunned by what was taking place did not act quickly enough to intervene, as Samuel Johnson screamed in agony and blood flowed from his hand. Langham and Fields tumbled down into a deep ravine, suddenly there was a single gunshot, it was then Anthony Fields who came up out the ravine. By this time Fairly, Johnson, and Montgomery had gotten back in the car and were proceeding to pull off with Fairley behind the wheel, when Fields jumps back in the car and they sped off in a panic getting lost. Not before long it started "raining bullets," according to Fairley, amazingly, none of them were hit. They were all apprehended and what Johnson and Fairley described as a racist lynch, made up of police, the prosecutor, and even the local judge descended on them at the jail. All of them were charged with the murder in a convoluted version of events that contradicted independent eyewitness testimony, physical, and forensic evidence. 

 Modern Day Lynching Through the Courts 

    Eventually, the prosecution presented a case that made Samuel Johnson, who was from New York, as the the person initiating the deadly assault and then commanding Fairley and Montgomery in assisting him. According to the prosecution Langham found the knife, took it back to his patrol car where the four men were, placed it on the roof, and then went back to continue searching the car. Johnson then commanded Fairley to pass him the knife, at which point he was able to sneak up on Langham and stab him twice, and as they pulled off, Johnson commanded Montgomery to shoot Langham, which Montgomery supposedly did. The only other blacks in the courtroom during the trials were the attorneys for Johnson, Fairley, and Montgomery, and Anthony Fields. The black attorneys were intimidated simply gave the prosecution whatever it wanted, including severing the cases, with Anthony Fields being that state's star witness against Johnson, Fairley, and Montgomery. There was no logical reason for the attorneys to sever Johnson, Fairley, and Montgomery, the only one who had a conflicting interest was Anthony Fields, and the main one that would benefit from the unnecessary severances was the prosecution. There were a number of witness who saw the incident as they drove down the road, everyone of them described Anthony Fields as the person they saw struggling with Langham, one saw when Johnson tried to grab the knife from Fields, so was not sure that he was also struggling with Langham. Thus, the importance of severing Johnson, Fairley, and Montgomery from each other.

       In three separate trials Anthony Fields testified repeating the state's version of events, which was contradicted by eyewitnesses and the forensic evidence. Samuel Johnson was given the death penalty, Fairely and Montgomery were both given life sentences, while Fields was given 25-years with parole. So key was this scheme that when the Mississippi Supreme Court reviewed the cases on appeal, it recited the same contradicted and baseless evidence, but placed a premium on the testimony of Anthony Fields over everything else, the court stated in each appeal:

       "Although a number of witnesses testified to seeing Patrolman Langham struggling with two or three black male assailants, the evidence most damaging to Fairley came in the form of the testimony of his first cousin, Anthony Fields. Fields testified that on the morning of the shooting he was staying in a hotel in New Orleans with Otis Lee Fairley. That day they met Samuel Johnson and Charles Montgomery. All four of them decided to come to Collins, Mississippi in Johnson's black over yellow LTD with the intent to pass bad checks.

      Fields testified that when they drove past a Mississippi Highway Patrol car parked in the median of Highway 49 the patrolman pursued them and pulled them over for speeding. That patrolman was Officer Langham. Langham asked Johnson for his drivers license but Johnson didn't have one. Langham then asked Johnson to get out of the car. After Johnson was out of the car, Langham saw a knife under the front seat. Langham reached under the seat, seized the knife, and put it on top of his patrol car parked behind Johnson's LTD. Langham then ordered the other occupants of the LTD to get out. According to Fields, Langham then searched them all.

     Langham ordered all four of the car's occupants to stand on the righthand side of his patrol car. He then proceeded to search Johnson's car. Fields testified that he saw Johnson whisper something to Fairley. Fairley then took the knife that Langham had put on top of the patrol car and gave it to Johnson. When Patrolman Langham began searching the back seat of Johnson's car, Johnson approached him and stabbed him in the back. Both Langham and Johnson reached for Langham's gun. Johnson then hollered for Fairley to knock Langham out. Fairley came over and started hitting Langham in the face. On Johnson's order, Montgomery grabbed Langham's gun and the fracus ceased momentarily. According to Fields, he, Montgomery, Johnson and Fairley then went back to Johnson's car. Patrolman Langham pleaded for his life but, on Johnson's order, Montgomery shot him in the head. Montgomery then threw the officer's revolver out the car window and the four men left the scene."

      This convoluted version of events have been treated as incontrovertible fact by the federal courts as well, although on their face they are more than questionable, for example were it stated that the intent of going to Collins was to pass "to pass bad checks."  There was no proof of this other than Field's testimony, which was contradicted by all three men. Showing criminality, no matter how irrelevant or unfounded, is a tactic that prosecutors, particularly in the South and especially against black defendants. And it did not occur to any judge that just because Langham saw a perfectly legal knife of the floor of the car, that he then had reasonable cause to then seize the occupants, for all he had at that point was a relatively minor traffic offenses against Johnson, supposedly speeding and driving without a license, hardly anything that would motivate assault or murder. Yet again, the evidence that carries the day 45-years later is this: "After Johnson was out of the car, Langham saw a knife under the front seat. Langham reached under the seat, seized the knife, and put it on top of his patrol car parked behind Johnson's LTD. Langham then ordered the other occupants of the LTD to get out." First, why would Langham pick up the knife, then why would he then take it back to his cruiser in order to place the knife on top of his patrol car, the same place where he then ordered all four men to go stand, then go back and search the car? First, Langham had no legal authority or right to be searching the car, no crime had been committed, other than Johnson driving without a license, but this is irrelevant in sending innocent black men to prison. And keep in mind that the courts are reciting the testimony of Anthony Fields as the "evidence beyond a reasonable doubt." the testimony of a co-defendant turned state's witness, against whom all testimonial and forensic evidence implicates as the sole culprit in the crime.    

     No court has ever questioned this scenario of events that makes no sense and is entirely unsupported by the forensic evidence, because real evidence was over-ridden by the importance that the state system placed on the testimony of Anthony Fields who further: "testified that he saw Johnson whisper something to Fairley. Fairley then took the knife that Langham had put on top of the patrol car and gave it to Johnson. When Patrolman Langham began searching the back seat of Johnson's car, Johnson approached him and stabbed him in the back. Both Langham and Johnson reached for Langham's gun. Johnson then hollered for Fairley to knock Langham out. Fairley came over and started hitting Langham in the face. On Johnson's order, Montgomery grabbed Langham's gun and the fracus ceased momentarily. According to Fields, he, Montgomery, Johnson and Fairley then went back to Johnson's car. Patrolman Langham pleaded for his life but, on Johnson's order, Montgomery shot him in the head. Montgomery then threw the officer's revolver out the car window and the four men left the scene."

      This is the State's version of Billy Langham's death, which has numerous gaping holes in it, mostly because it entirely relays on the rehearsed testimony of a killer, supported by the State intimidating defense attorneys and forcing them to undercut their effectively and competently representing their clients. Billy Langham did not die along the roadside, his body was retrieved from the bottom of a ravine, and no gun powder burns where found on Montgomery, while the State did not even test Fields, or withheld the findings. It is not clear that any of the men were tested for gunshot burns. And the point of impact and trajectory of the bullet would show that Langham could not have been shot from the car, the bullet wound was at point blank range. And keep in mind that after taking Langham's gun the "fracus ceased momentarily," and the four men "went back to their car," yet the "fracus" was to have occurred at their car, so where was Langham? They fled from Langham "back" to their car, with his gun, so where was Langham when he was supposedly "pleading for his life"? In order to have been shot in the head from the car, he would have had to be next to it kneeling. There is no evidence of where he was when he died, because it was not where the State claimed he was, and no judge, no court, has ever had a problem with this patently concocted story.

MY FRIENDS AND COMRADES

     I met all three men while I myself was being illegally held prisoner by the State of Mississippi, Otis Lee Fairley were housed together a few months and immediately hit it off as we discussed our cases and the work we were doing on them. I met Charles Montgomery through Fairley, but we were never housed together and he did not make many trips to the law library while I was there, but that is where Sam Johnson and I got to know each other. Samuel Johnson stood about 6'4," was in his late 30s, overweight but not fat, it is doubtful that he could creep up on glass of water, more less an excited racist Mississippi trooper. Sam was a gregarious fellow, always had a smile and a good joke, he would make people laugh and smile. Sam was very intelligent and he helped other prisoners understand the legal issues in their cases, eventually, most of death row centered around Sam Johnson s a source of spiritual inspiration. 

      Otis Fairley was also a bit gregarious, a rank-amateur chess player, but he knew how to read and write, and he knew something about researching law and legal procedure. Fairley, at the time, had hair and wore it in a good old fashioned Afro, and even though had the build and prison experience to be a predator, he was not. Fairley had not long before this incident gotten out of Huntsville on a life sentence from a mistake he made as a jealous teen in love, he killed his girlfriend in a fit of rage. Fairely was held for over a decade, so came to adulthood in the Texas Department of Corrections. Still, Fairley was no criminal, I never knew him, Sam, or Montgomery to be involved in doing anyone any harm of any type, of being involved with any of the various criminal enterprises in the system. I got Fairley to help form the prisoners union, he loved fighting the prison administration, he and Sam, we worked on various suits against the prison that brought about a number of changes in spite of the Reagan-era judiciary, and constant threats against out safety. Sam used to say "fuck it, they planning to kill me anyway," and then he'd bust-out in this contagious chuckle, all the while he is weighted down with the injustice of it all, along with chains and shackles in his red jumpsuit - "Death Row" attire. 

WE HAVE SEEN THIS BEFORE

    This case is almost identical to that of Troy Anthony Davis, the young black man who was wrongfully executed in Georgia by the United States, not just the State of Georgia. In that case, the killer was made the star witness for the state, and the overrode all considerations of the evidence, which was basically that the state concocted the prosecution. In that case, as in the case of Samuel Johnson, Otis Lee Fairley, Charles Montgomery, the star witness got off cheap. Troy Anthony was executed.Traditionally in the Jim Crow South, whenever it was alleged that a single white person had been offended by a single black person, more than one would then be sought out and held to account for whatever offense was alleged, whether actual or not. This was the nature of the more than 3,000 known lynchings of black folk that occurred between 1887 and the 1950s, a twisted sense of justice where more than the guilty black must pay for his transgression, the black community at large must be subject as well. There are thousands of cases where a white person is murdered, and if a black person is involved, other black people who have nothing to do with the case will be made part of it, a couple of black folk are going to prison just for being black. 

     Samuel Johnson eventually was able to at least get his death sentence overturned in 1988, although a group of so-called "civil rights" lawyers got involved in Sam's case, their focus was not justice, but rather their opposition to the death penalty. So, they never challenged the evident frame up, the suppression of evidence, and the incompetence and lack of ethics by the lawyers that represented them. Much has been made these "civil-rights lawyers," how those attorneys were only paid $2,500 to represent Samuel Johnson, still that does not excuse their highly questionable decision to severe the three cases. This played into the scheme of framing the cases on the three men, instead of three-fingers pointing at one, it was one on one, Fields against Johnson, Fairley, and Montgomery in separate redneck lynching trials. Fields in fact, was not sent to Parchman, but was kept at the jail as one of the sheriff's "trustees"/servant and was released in 1989. None of the "civil-rights" lawyers offered to help Fairley or Montgomery because they were not concerned with guilt or innocence, just getting Johnson off of death row.

THESE MEN NEED YOUR HELP

     Although Samuel Johnson had his death sentenced in 1988, he was kept on death row for nearly a decade longer and was eventually transferred to general population. Unfortunately, Samuel Johnson was diagnosed with cancer and in March 2001, passed away in prison. MDOC officials refused to allow his family to see him as he lay dying. 

    In September 2012,  Otis Lee Fairley was again denied parole and given a 5 year set-off. Charles Montgomery has also been denied parole and in fact, both men are the target of a number of "red-neck" campaigns to make sure that these men are never released. 

TO CONTACT THESE MEN:

Otis Lee Fairly, prisoner #42535                                                                                                                      Unit 28, Mississippi State Penitentiary                                                                                                  Parchman Mississippi 38738

Charles Montgomery, prisoner #42332                                                                                                          Unit 28, Mississippi State Penitentiary,                                                                                                          Parchman Mississippi 39739